Banned Books I’ve Read.

 

Banned Books    Some of the Banned Books I’ve Read.

This week marks another  anniversary of the ALA’s (American Library Association)’s Banned Books week. If you’re unfamiliar with Banned books week, here is a link directing you to the ALA’s  website. It gives you a much  much more precise account of what Banned Books Week means. In short, Banned Books Weeks is a celebration of  our freedom to read and write whatever we want. It brings awareness to books that have been previously banned or challenged. Banned Books Week reminds us to speak out against  censorship, and  to challenge anyone who thinks they have the right to restrict our reading. At least that’s what it means to me.

The books I read as a kid have made me the adult I am today. I was very fortunate to  have parents who never censored my reading, and a library system that kept its shelves fully stocked with a wide variety of books.  I am forever grateful to this, and I  can’t imagine my  childhood and my life without some of those books.

Here is a list of all the “banned” or challenged books I’ve read over the years. I’ve been quite the rebel 🙂

Banned Books I’ve read:

Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Animal Farm by George Orwell

1984 by George Orwell

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier

The Giver by Lois Lowry

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

Go Ask Alice by Anonymous

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

One Flew Over the Cuckoos’s Nest Ken Kessey

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Bridge To Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Goosebumps by R.L Stine

The Outsides by S.E. Hinton

Feed by M.T. Anderson

James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

Where’s Waldo by Martin Hanford

Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey

The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

Fifty Shades of Grey by El James

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Looking for Alaska by John Green

The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The Kite Runner by Khalid Hussein

His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman

I should mention that I didn’t enjoy all of these books, however,  I’m glad that I got to decide how I felt about them for myself. I’ve probably read a bunch more, but this list can get really really long, so I’ll leave it here. Feel free to share some of your favorite banned or challenged books with me.

Happy reading!

 

 

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on “Banned Books I’ve Read.

  1. Wow, that’s quite the list! It amazes me at how many classics are banned. I can’t imagine my life without Harry Potter! I’m so glad that no one ever restricted my reading! I think that all parents should have a right to decide what’s appropriate for their own kids. Nice post! 🙂

    • Thank you 🙂 I feel the same. A childhood without Harry would have been glum indeed. I agree, the only people who have a right to interfere in what kids read are parents. And I’m grateful too!

  2. That’s quite a list! A lot of them are on my own list as well… I still cannot believe the amount of classics and personal favorites on the banned books list! I mean, growing up without HP, 1984, To Kill A Mockingbird, Brave New World, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, The Great Gatsby, Animal Farm, Roald Dahl…I’m glad nobody ever restricked my reading.

    • Right?! I can’t imagine it either. And there are some books that just make me laugh when I see they’re on the banned list. Like Where’s Waldo and Captain Underpants. I mean really? Lucky for us! .

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